Gault&Millau 2020: 4 toques for the Hubertus Stube

Promotion for the Jagdhof’s à la carte gourmet restaurant

‘Many thanks to Gault&Millau, Boris Meyer and his team – and congratulations!’ Armin Pfurtscheller is beyond thrilled: The Hubertus Stube at the 5-star SPA-HOTEL Jagdhof in Neustift has for the first time achieved a rating of 4 toques and 17 points in the Gault&Millau 2020 gourmet guide! ‘This is a terrific achievement by our team, and the second time in a row that it has improved its rating!’ In the Gault&Millau 2020 guide, the Hubertus Stube in Neustift is rated with 17 out of 20 points and 4 out of 5 toques – that’s one point and two toque more than last year.

Rising star for Gault&Millau 2020

Chef Boris Meyer concurs with the praise lavished upon him by Jagdhof proprietor Armin Pfurtscheller: ‘It’s great that we’ve again managed to improve on the previous year – especially now with Gault&Millau’s new rating system! I too would like to thank the whole team for all their hard work! I would also like to say thank you to our loyal guests, and the Gault&Millau assessors who have shown so much appreciation of our labour of love. Above all, however, I thank Armin, Christina and Alban Pfurtscheller. Without them, their trust, support and the environment they have created here in Stubai, this success would not be possible! Thank you.’

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Gault&Millau 2020: 4 toques for the Hubertus Stube
Gault&Millau 2020: 4 toques for the Hubertus Stube

Gault & Millau 2020 review

‘It’s amazing how the Hubertus Stube’s team, whose cooking has been consistently impressive over the years, can always go one better and bring us new surprises. We started with some outstanding mangalitsa bacon, made by a farmer in a neighbouring village. The seven-course Hubertus menu, not including the pre-dessert and amuse gueules, is highly recommended. The prelude is provided by an exciting plate of scallops (fried and marinated) and a terrine of pig’s ear. A daring but successful start. Lobster (flambé) and Alpine char (confit) provide two fabulous fish courses before a perfectly roasted brie heralds the meat courses. The menu’s highlight is the magnificent roast venison with chanterelle mushrooms and Baumkuchen. The wine service is extremely guest-friendly, special requests were met with great flexibility, and recommendations were interestingly unusual. If the chef and sommelier cannot agree on a wine, they serve both: Thermenregion and Mallorca. Both exceptionally good.’

New: 5 toques for Gault&Millau Austria

For the past forty years, the Gault&Millau Austria restaurant guide awarded ratings of 1 to 4 toques and 13 to 20 points. With the gourmet guide’s 2020 edition, the point and toque system has changed, and now follows the Gault&Millau France model. Above all, the new rating system and equalises international comparability. ‘In order to do justice to this international and increasingly strong brand, we licensees need to come together and apply the same system’, says Gault&Millau Austria’s publisher Karl Hohenlohe. Entry into the league of toques now starts at 11 points with the new five-toque system. Restaurants that were previously awarded 13 points will now carry an 11-point rating. ‘The expanded points and toque system provide the opportunity to award ratings that are even more precise and nuanced. This seems particularly useful for two and three-toque restaurants, as it will offer diners much more clarity than before,’ says editor-in-chief Martina Hohenlohe.

Gault&Millau facts

The Gault&Millau restaurant guide was founded in 1969 by journalists Henri Gault and Christian Millau, who in 1973 championed contemporary cuisine. The guide’s first German edition was published in 1983. The Austrian edition of Gault&Millau is published by Martina and Karl Hohenlohe. The ratings are modelled on the French school grading system on a scale from 0 to 20 points. True to the spirit of the founders Gault and Millau, the highest score of 20 is not be awarded in Austria, because ‘perfection is God’s preserve and beyond the limitations of a human being’. The judging is conducted anonymously by seasoned gourmets whose remit it is to judge objectively, correctly and fairly in a way that is comprehensible and amusing.